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Questions about Bar Graphs

Learning Objectives

Students will solve simple put-together, take-apart, and compare problems using information presented in a bar graph.

Grade Level

Grade 2

Common Core Standard

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.MD.D.10
Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with single-unit scale) to represent a data set with up to four categories. Solve simple put-together, take-apart, and compare problems using information presented in a bar graph.

 

Materials Needed

Previous lesson “Second Grade Math Graphing and Agility Lesson”

Student copies of the graph below “Fun Agility Training”

Student-created graphs about favorite agility course obstacle

Snap cubes, around 25 per student or pair of students, depending how you group students

Document camera, optional

Lesson

This lesson is a follow up to the lesson titled “Second Grade Math Graphing and Agility Lesson”

Introduction/Access Prior Knowledge

  • Show students 5 snap cubes. Ask “How many cubes would I have if I double the amount in my hand?  How many would I have if I get 7 more cubes?”
  • Show students 12 snap cubes. Ask “How many cubes would I have if I take away 4 cubes?  What if I take away 10 cubes?
  • Show 7 red cubes in one hand and 3 blue cubes in the other hand.  Ask “How many more red cubes than blue cubes do I have?  How many cubes do I have in all?”
  • You may want to allow students to have sets of cubes to work with at their tables as well.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling

  • Either project on the board or pass out copies of the graph below.
  • Review the parts of the graph: title, labels, numbers up the left side.  Ask students how many people chose Tunnel as the most fun agility course obstacle. Check to make sure students are reading the graph correctly.
  • Ask students to tell how many people chose each activity listed on this graph, checking for comprehension.
  • Model how to create a copy of this graph using snap cubes.  You may want to suggest students use a different color of snap cube for each category.

Graph-for-Questions-About-Bar-Graphs

Independent Working Time

  • Students will answer the following questions about the graph provided, using their snap cubes to support their thinking and defend their answers when describing their solutions.
  • How many people are represented in this graph?
  • How many people chose Tunnel AND Jump High Bar altogether?
  • How many more people chose Pole Weave than See Saw?
  • How many more people chose Pole Weave and See Saw than Tunnel and Jump High Bar?

Review and Closing

  • Review the answers with students.
  • Call on different students to explain how they know they are correct, using the snap cubes to “prove” their answer.

Extension

  • Students come up with questions similar to 1 through 4 above about their own graph (created in the previous lesson) and then trade with a partner to answer more questions about bar graphs.

 

References

Tonnesen, Krista. (02/08/16). The Future of Canine Sport: Junior Handlers. Retrieved from https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/news/future-canine-sport-junior-handlers/.

 

 

 

 

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