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  • Comparing and Contrasting Characters for Grades 1-2 +

    Comparing and Contrasting Characters in the picture book Because of Bentley and the video Denali the Therapy Dog

    Learning Objectives

    Students will compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of two therapy dogs.

    Grade Levels

    1-2

    Common Core Standard

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.1.9
    Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories.

    Materials Needed

    Chart paper or white board

    Bentley and Denali Chart

    Because of Bentley by Loren Spiotta-DiMare

    *You may purchase Because of Bentley  here: www.LorensReadingRoom.com

    Denali the Therapy Dog Video (Click HERE)

    Computer, projector and audio for display

    Lesson

    Introduction and Teacher Modeling

    • Draw a venn diagram on the board or on chart paper. Label one side cookies and another side ice cream. Encourage students to help you fill out the venn diagram, noting the items’ similarities and differences.
    • Explain that comparing and contrasting means thinking about how two things (or characters) are alike and how they are different.

    Guided Practice

    • Tell students you will be reading a nonfiction picture book to them about a therapy dog. Ask if they know the difference between fiction and nonfiction and briefly discuss those differences.
    • Post the “Bentley and Denali” Document on a Smart Board or document camera. If you do not have access to either of these, recreate it on the board.
    • First read the book, Because of Bentley by Loren Spiotta-DiMare.
    • Then play the video about Denali, the therapy dog.
    • As you are reading or watching, have students help you fill out information about each dog.
    • Questions to pose to students while reading and watching:
      • What breed of dog is Bentley?
      • Bentley is a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. Does anyone know about Cavaliers?
        • Cavaliers were bred to be lap dogs. So they are very affectionate and love to cuddle.  These traits make them excellent therapy dogs.  They are also small, weighing between 13 and 18 pounds.  There are four colors of Cavaliers:  Blenheim reddish brown and white, black and tan, (black with some reddish brown markings on their faces and legs), ruby (solid chestnut red) and tricolor white with black patches and some reddish brown markings on their faces.)
      • What breed of dog is Denali?
      • Denali is a Spinone Italiano. Does anyone know anything about the Spinone Italiano?
        • The Spinone Italiano was bred to be a hunting dog. They are sociable and patient, but sometimes stubborn. The Spinone is originally from Italy. They have an excellent nose for smelling, as well as a very soft mouth. A “soft mouth” means that he/she gently picks up objects with his/her mouth.
    • Ask students what they know about therapy dogs and discuss ways that therapy dogs help people. What makes them special? Can all dogs be therapy dogs? How do we know?

    Independent Work

    • When you are finished, allow students to work with a partner or small group to create a venn diagram. You may also choose to provide them with a printable venn diagram. They should use the information from the “Bentley and Denali” Document.
    • With support, encourage them to compare and contrast Bentley and Denali.

    Review and Closing

    • When students are finished, allow them to share their venn diagrams.
    • Ask students, how did the video of Denali help us to better understand Bentley’s story? How did Bentley’s story help us to better understand Denali’s story?
    • Tell students that we compare and contrast to help us better understand characters.

    You can find other great resources for “Because of Bentley” at http://www.lorensreadingroom.com/.

    Additional standards based lesson plans, hands-on activities and professional development can be found on the AKC® Educator Resources page found here: http://www.akc.org/public-education/educator-resources/.

  • Character Changes Lesson Plan for Grades 2-3 +

    Cause and Effect in “Because of Bentley”

    Learning Objectives

    Students will identify cause and effect relationships within a nonfiction text.

    Grade Levels

    2-3

    Common Core Standard

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.1
    Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.1
    Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

    Materials Needed

    White board or chart paper

    Because of Bentley by Loren Spiotta-DiMare

    Comic Strip Checklist

    Comic Strip Paper

    Comic Strip Rubric (Optional)

    Lesson

    Introduction and Teacher Modeling

    • Review the concept of cause and effect with simple examples.

    Write on the board:

    1. The teacher brought her umbrella to school.
    2. It is raining outside.
    • Ask students to consider which of these events came first. They should say that (b) It is raining outside, came first. This is the cause. The effect is (a) the teacher brought her umbrella to school.
    • Explain to students that the cause of something is always what happens first and the effect is what happens second.
    • Provide a few more examples until you feel confident that the students understand the concept.
    • Invite students to work with a partner or small group to create their own example of cause and effect.
    • After the pair-and-share session, invite volunteers to share their ideas with the entire class, and reinforce which is the cause and which is the effect.
    • Tell students that an author uses cause and effect as an element of writing.
    • Explain that today students are going to listen to a read-aloud and determine the multiple cause-and-effect situations that the main character encounters.

    Guided Practice

    • Gather students together. Introduce the book Because of Bentley by Loren Spiotta-DiMare. Explain to students that Because of Bentley is a nonfiction book. Ask students to describe the difference between nonfiction and fiction.
    • Because of Bentley has an author and an illustrator. What is the role of the author? What is the role of the illustrator?
    • Begin by doing a picture walk. Ask students to consider what the book might be about.
    • Use a think-aloud after each cause-and-effect relationship to model and identify the relationship to the students. For example, read the first three pages and say, “Bentley loved the class so Diane signed him up for other kinds of dog training classes including Agility, Conformation, and Obedience.”
    • From that example, ask students to consider which is the cause and which is the effect. Once they have had a chance to think about it and share, explain that the cause is that Bentley enjoyed his Puppy Kindergarten class and the effect is that Diane signed him up for more classes.”
    • Continue reading the book, pausing to point out each cause and effect relationship. Write down each of them on chart paper or the white board.
    • Once you have finished reading the book, consider each of the cause and effect relationships and have students consider how each effected the story. For example, Bentley enjoyed his Puppy Kindergarten class and the effect was Diane signed him up for more classes. Because of that, Diane’s friend suggested Bentley might enjoy being a Pet Therapy Dog, which is how the story came to be.

    Independent Work

    • Explain to students that they will be using one of the cause and effect relationships to create a comic strip.
    • The comic strip will have three boxes.
      1. Box 1: Cause
      2. Box 2: Effect
      3. Box 3: How it affected the story.
    • Pass out the “Comic Strip Checklist” and review with students to ensure they understand the requirements. Students should draft their comic strip on lined paper before creating it on the “Comic Strip Paper.” If you will be grading this assignment, pas out the “Comic Strip Rubric” and review with students.
    • You may also choose to make your own as an example comic strip to model.

    Review and Closing

    • When students are finished, they may share their comic strip with the class.
    • Review cause and effect and how it affects a story.

    You can find other great resources for “Because of Bentley” at http://www.lorensreadingroom.com/.

    Additional standards based lesson plans, hands-on activities and professional development can be found on the AKC® Educator Resources page found here: http://www.akc.org/public-education/educator-resources/.

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