Brittany wading through water and reeds, hunting.
Brittany

What's a dog breed?

People have been breeding dogs since prehistoric times. The earliest dog breeders used wolves to create domestic dogs. From the beginning, humans purposefully bred dogs to perform various tasks. Hunting, guarding, and herding are thought to be among the earliest job…

What's a dog breed?

People have been breeding dogs since prehistoric times. The earliest dog breeders used wolves to create domestic dogs. From the beginning, humans purposefully bred dogs to perform various tasks. Hunting, guarding, and herding are thought to be among the earliest jobs eagerly performed by the animal destined to be called “man’s best friend.”

For thousands of years, humans bred dogs toward the physical and mental traits best suited for the work expected of them. The sleek Greyhound types bred to chase fleet-footed prey, and the huge mastiff types used as guard dogs and warriors, are two ancient examples of dogs bred for specific jobs.

As humans became more sophisticated, so did their dogs. Eventually, there emerged specific breeds of dogs, custom-bred to suit the breeders’ local needs and circumstances. The Greyhound, for instance, was the foundation type for the immense Irish Wolfhound and the dainty Italian Greyhound. All three have a distinct family resemblance, but you’d never mistake one for another.

So, then, when is a breed a breed and not just a kind or type of dog? The simplest way to define a breed is to say it always “breeds true.” That is, breeding a purebred Irish Setter to another purebred Irish Setter will always produce dogs instantly recognizable as Irish Setters.

Each breed’s ideal physical traits, movement, and temperament are set down in a written document called a “breed standard.” For example, the breed standard sets forth the traits that make a Cocker Spaniel a Cocker Spaniel and not a Springer Spaniel.

The AKC standard for each breed originates with a “parent club,” the AKC-recognized national club devoted to a particular breed. Once approved by the AKC, a standard becomes both the breeder’s “blueprint” and the instrument used by dog show judges to evaluate a breeder’s work.

There are over 340 dog breeds known throughout the world. The American Kennel Club recognizes 193 breeds.

Beauceron

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Belgian Laekenois

Belgian Laekenois

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Belgian Malinois

Belgian Malinois

The smart, confident, and versatile Belgian Malinois is a world-class worker who forges a…

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Belgian Sheepdog

Belgian Sheepdog

The Belgian Sheepdog is a highly trainable herder whose versatility and intelligence is the stuff…

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Belgian Tervuren

Belgian Tervuren

The elegant, agile Belgian Tervuren is a bright and self-assured herding dog of medium size, know…

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Berger Picard

Berger Picard

The Berger Picard is a lanky herding dog of strong bone and sturdy build. Picards spent centurie…

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Black and Tan Coonhound

Black and Tan Coonhound

Large, athletic hunters who work nights, Black and Tan Coonhounds are friendly, easygoing hound…

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Black Russian Terrier

Black Russian Terrier

The Black Russian Terrier is a large, immensely powerful worker of heavy bone and coarse all-black…

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Bloodhound

Bloodhound

The world famous “Sleuth Hound” does one thing better than any creature on earth: find people…

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Borzoi

Borzoi

Among the most impressively beautiful of all dogs, the aristocratic Borzoi is cherished for hi…

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Bouvier des Flandres

Bouvier des Flandres

They don’t build ’em like this anymore. Burly and barrel-chested, the tousle-coated dog of…

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Boxer

Boxer

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