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  • Temperament: Intelligent, Responsive, Loving
  • Height: 19-21 inches
  • Weight: 40-60 pounds
  • Life Expectancy: 13-15 years
  • Group: Foundation Stock Service

    The AKC has grouped all of the breeds that it registers into seven categories, or groups, roughly based on function and heritage. Breeds are grouped together because they share traits of form and function or a common heritage.

FCI Standard
Stabyhoun standing in green grass with a garden in the background

About the Stabyhoun

Stabyhoun translates from the Dutch (sta-me-bij-hond) as “Stand-by-me-dog” and is pronounced: stah-bay-hoon. The Staby’s independent nature was a deliberately bred characteristic by farmers who wanted a dog that could hunt independently for moles and rabbits. That propensity we still see today, therefore you cannot be upset if he looks for prey independently and, for example, digs in the garden. With proper guidance, a Staby is a gentle dog and a great friend for life.

Stabys are also very inquisitive. Always pay attention to what a Stabyhoun is up to, because with their inquisitive nature, they can quickly get into trouble. If you think your Staby will sit quietly if something happens, you will often be disappointed. Although Stabys make a lot of noise when something is wrong or to alert his owner, they generally expect the owner to further investigate before they accept that things are normal. Most Stabys will need to verify that there are no “surprises” in store before calming down again.

This breed is a functional and powerfully-built pointing dog that originated in the Netherlands. The majority of Stabyhouns are black and white. The brown and white coloring is seen in the Netherlands, but the orange and white Stabyhoun is nearly extinct. The Staby’s build is such that it is greater in length than in height and similarly, the head shows more length than width. The feathering on his chest, collar, forelegs, trousers and tail gives the Staby the impression of being longhaired, but the coat is not excessively long. The Stabyhoun is considered to be an “all-around” dog, with abilities in hunting, retrieving, and pointing. They are also ideal family dogs because of their size and affectionate character.

 

Club Contact Details

Club: Ameri-Can Stabyhoun Association
Name: Susie Nies
Email: AKCrep@stabyhouns.org
Address: 0N282 Cumnor Ave, Glen Ellyn, IL 60137
Phone: (630) 632-3443

Breed Clubs and Rescue

Want to connect with other people who love the same breed as much as you do? We have plenty of opportunities to get involved in your local community, thanks to AKC Breed Clubs located in every state, and more than 450 AKC Rescue Network groups across the country.
Stabyhoun

Find a Puppy: Stabyhoun

AKC Marketplace | PuppyFinder

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Care

NUTRITION

You are going to want to feed your Staby a formula that will cater to his unique digestive needs throughout the various phases of his life. Many dog food companies have breed-specific formulas for small, medium, large and extra-large breeds. The Stabyhoun is a medium-sized breed. Other than that, the Staby is very easy to care for and does not tend to overeat or put on excessive weight.

What you feed your dog is an individual choice, but working with your veterinarian and/or breeder will be the best way to determine frequency of meals as a puppy and the best adult diet to increase his longevity. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.

GROOMING

A Stabyhoun’s grooming needs are almost nonexistent. Unless he is neutered, any necessary hair trimming can be done yourself. A neutered dog also comes with what is called a “castrated coat” where the undercoat is exploding and which may require a bit more grooming.

Otherwise, the medium-length coat of the Stabyhoun is self-cleaning, meaning dirt falls off by itself when the coat is dry. One brush through it to remove the last remnants of sand and he is clean again. This also means that he only rarely gets a bath. Even if he really is very dirty, just a rinse or a swim in a clean pool is usually sufficient. Shampoo is only required if he has been rolling in something smelly; then, use a special, neutral dog shampoo so as not to disturb his skin oils.

Grooming Frequency

Occasional Bath/Brush
Specialty/Professional
Occasional Bath/Brush

Shedding

Infrequent
Frequent
Seasonal

EXERCISE

Daily exercise is necessary for the mental and physical health of your Staby. They do not require more than a good daily hour of exercise. Afterwards, they are then content to sleep and rest quietly during the day. What is perhaps even more important is that the Staby needs a mental challenge. Stabys need to have a function in daily life, and preference should be given to something that offers variety. Agility, hunting, scent training, and lure courses can all be productive and stimulating to your Staby. A busy dog is the perfect dog.

Energy Level

Couch Potato
Needs Lots of Activity
Energetic

TRAINING

Stabys are self-motivated and quick learners. The reason for this lies mainly in the fact that the Staby had to work independently to destroy pests, so it was handy to have a real “thinker.” That suited the breed well at a time when there were few outside influences and hardly any traffic.

With positive and soft training, the Staby is quick to learn and wants to please. Too much pressure is never a good idea while a good coach is important. Stabys like a job, but his family must provide a fair and consistent approach to his training, which is very important for a peaceful, happy and diverse education. A tough approach is useless with the Staby. He will completely cease working and no longer voluntarily perform his duties.

Trainability

May be Stubborn
Eager to Please
Easy Training

Temperament/Demeanor

Aloof/Wary
Outgoing
Alert/Responsive

HEALTH

The Stabyhoun is, despite its small population, fortunately a relatively healthy breed. The ASA and the NVSW do everything possible to keep it that way. Nevertheless, there are certain diseases more or less occurring regularly. The ASA’s breeding program is aimed to reduce these occurrences as much as possible, though it is not easy as the causes are not always clear or strictly hereditary. There is a definite challenge in making smart matches. Currently, diseases being watched are Epilepsy, HD, ED, Patent Ductus Arteriosus, and Cerebral dysfunction.

 

Recommended Health Tests From Parent Club

  • Cerebral Dysfunction Test for a dog with carrier parents
  • Hip and Elbow Certification
Stabyhoun
Stabyhoun
Stabyhoun
Stabyhoun

History

Native to the Netherlands, the Stabyhoun is related to the Drentsche Patrijshond and Heidewachtel. He probably owes his name to his versatility; the word Stabyhoun is derived from the words sta mij bij or “stand by me,” while houn is the Frisian word for dog and is pronounced “hoon.”

The Stabyhoun originated in the Frisian forest area of the Netherlands along with another breed, the Wetterhoun. In the early 20th century, Stabyhoun and Wetterhoun were regularly crossbred with each other, thereby, the unique varieties of each were threatened to be lost. In 1938, a group of enthusiastic people of the Kynologenclub Friesland started purifying the two breeds again and, in 1942, both breeds were officially recognized. Important names in this process were:  J. Bos, T. van Dijk, B. de Graaf and W. Hoeksema. The first standard was dated February 10, 1944. In 1947, the Dutch Association for Staby and Wetterhounen (NVSW) was established with the mission to represent the interests of the Frisian breeds.

The first recorded Stabyhoun litter born in the United States was in 1994. As of 2017, the population of the Stabyhoun is more than 7,000 dogs worldwide. His popularity has grown across much of Europe and North America, including Belgium, Finland, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, the US and the UK, in addition to his native Netherlands.

Did You Know?

The Stabyhoun has been assigned the Sporting Group designation.
The Stabyhoun is a project-oriented dog and loves to share in his owner's tasks.
The Stabyhoun that we know today shows definite similarities to dogs that were depicted in paintings from the 17th century. For example, those by the well-known Dutch artist Jan Steen.
The Stabyhoun (spelled Stabijhoun in Dutch) is also called a "Friese Stabij," or Frisian Pointer.
The Stabyhoun has been recorded in the Foundation Stock Service since March 2005.
The Stabyhoun has been approved to compete in AKC Companion events since July 1, 2008.
The Stabyhoun has been approved to compete in AKC Performance events since July 1, 2011.