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  • Temperament: Energetic, Lively, Ready to Work
  • AKC Breed Popularity: Ranks 162 of 194
  • Height: 16-18.5 inches (male), 15-17.5 inches (female)
  • Weight: 27-29 pounds (male), 22-24 pounds (female)
  • Life Expectancy: 12-13 years
  • Group: Herding Group

    The AKC has grouped all of the breeds that it registers into seven categories, or groups, roughly based on function and heritage. Breeds are grouped together because they share traits of form and function or a common heritage.

Pumi standing in three-quarter view facing forward
Pumi sitting facing forward
Pumi standing sideways facing left
Pumi coat detail

The Pumi is a medium-sized alert, intelligent, energetic, and agile Hungarian herding breed, originating in the seventeenth or eighteenth centuries from the
ancestral Puli, and used to herd cattle, sheep, and swine. He is characterized by his square outline, curly coat, circular tail, and long head with semi-erect ears, and whimsical expression. The Pumi originated in Hungary where pastures were small and the livestock were driven to local fields for grazing. He is a versatile stock dog, equally adept at gathering, driving and keeping the stock within boundaries as directed by the shepherd, working very close to the livestock, and using his voice and quick movement to keep the stock under control.

HEAD

Long, with the muzzle 40 to 50 percent of the length of the head. The planes are parallel with a slight stop.
Expression is lively and intelligent.
Eyes are medium sized, dark brown, deep set, and oval, set moderately wide apart and slightly oblique. The pigment is dark and complete with tightly-fitting eye rims.
Ears are set on high, of medium size, and carried two-thirds erect with the tips pointing somewhat towards the sides. The ears are covered with hair, enhancing their whimsical expression. The ears are mobile and alert, moving quickly in reaction to any stimulation.
Disqualifications – Ears prick or hanging

BODY

The body is smooth and tight with hard, but not bulging muscles, and particularly lean. The back is short, straight, and taut. The loin is short, straight, and firmly coupled. The croup is not too long, slightly sloped, and of medium breadth. The chest is deep, fairly narrow, and extends well back to a moderate tuck-up. The ribs are slightly sprung with a deep brisket reaching to the elbows. The forechest is not pronounced. The depth of the chest is slightly less than 50 percent of the height at the withers.

FOREQUARTERS

The shoulders are moderately angulated, with long, well-knit shoulder blades and an upper arm matching in length. The angle formed between the shoulder blade and upper arm should be 100 to 110 degrees. The elbows are tucked firmly against the brisket. The legs are long and straight, with medium bone. The pastern is very slightly sloped. The feet are tight and round with well-knit toes – a cat foot, with well-cushioned pads. The nails are strong and preferably black or nearly black.

HINDQUARTERS

The hindquarters are well-developed and muscular, and in balance with the
forequarters having moderate angulation. The upper thigh is thick and strong, with a long, strong second thigh. The hocks are short, vertical, and parallel to each other. A vertical line can be drawn from the ischium down to the ground just in front of the rear toes when viewed from the side. Rear dewclaws, if any, may be removed. Hind feet same as the forefeet

COAT

The coat is a combination of wavy and curly hair, forming corkscrews or curls all over the body, and is never smooth or corded. The coat consists of an even mixture of harsh hair and softer undercoat. The coat stands out from the body approximately 1½ to 3 inches and is prepared using a combination of stripping and trimming. The eyes and the foreface are free of long hair. The hair on the underside of the tail ranges from ½ inch at its shortest to 3 to 5 inches
and has little undercoat. In order to achieve the characteristic corkscrews and curls in the coat, the hair is allowed to dry naturally. The coat must never appear fluffed and blown dry, obscuring the characteristic curls.

TAIL

Tail – set high, it arches over the back forming a full circle from base to tip, sitting just on top of the topline. In re-pose it may hang down. Docking is not permitted nor is a naturally short tail (stump).

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About the Pumi

The Pumi (POO-mee; plural Pumik) was conceived as a compact, quick, and fearless sheepherder capable of moving flocks on the narrow roads connecting the pastures of western Hungary. At a glance, it might be hard to believe that this cuddly charmer was born to do such tough work. With his coat of corkscrew curls, circular tail, expressive ears, and distinctively whimsical look, the Pumi is all kinds of cute. But beneath the curls is a lean, deep-chested herder with a seemingly endless capacity for work and play.

Breed Clubs and Rescue

Want to connect with other people who love the same breed as much as you do? We have plenty of opportunities to get involved in your local community, thanks to AKC Breed Clubs located in every state, and more than 450 AKC Rescue Network groups across the country.
Pumi

Find a Puppy: Pumi

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Care

NUTRITION

The Pumi can be fed a high-quality dog food appropriate to the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior). Treats can be an important aid in training, but giving too many can cause obesity. Give table scraps sparingly, if at all, especially avoiding cooked bones and foods with very high fat content. Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet.

GROOMING

The Pumi’s coat consists of 50 percent soft hair and 50 percent harsher hair, all the same length. He needs combing every three to six weeks, followed by a good wetting-down to let the coat curl back up. Once curled, the coat can be trimmed to keep it looking tidy. The Pumi doesn’t shed, but hair will come out during grooming. Using a blow-dryer on the Pumi’s coat is not recommended, as this will remove the characteristic curls.

EXERCISE

The Pumi is very intelligent and energetic, needing regular exercise and mental stimulation. They’re also quite agile and will climb over and under things, and they love to be in high places to see what’s going on. Their favorite toys are often tennis balls and flying discs, and a Pumi is likely to demand a good chase-and-fetch game with these. The breed’s qualities make the Pumi increasingly popular in agility, obedience, and numerous other dog sports and companion events.

TRAINING

The Pumi is a thinking dog who must assess each new situation, so it is vital for the breed to have early socialization as puppies. A Pumi will learn quickly and has a boundless willingness to work without being obsessive about it. He is an active dog, and if provided with daily exercise and mental activity he makes a wonderful housedog. Because Pumik enjoy using their voices, barking should not be reinforced.

HEALTH

Pumis are generally a very healthy breed, with a few conditions that may exist in the breed’s gene pool. These include elbow and hip dysplasia, patellar luxation, degenerative myelopathy (DM), and several eye disorders. The website of the breed’s parent club, the Hungarian Pumi Club of America, provides detailed information on Pumi health.

Recommended Health Test from the National Breed Club:

  • Hip Evaluation
  • Patella Evaluation
  • PLL DNA Test
  • Degenerative Myelopathy DNA Test
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History

Authorities recognize three sheepdogs indigenous to Hungary: the Mudi, Puli, and Pumi. The Puli is thought to be the oldest, established in what is now Hungary around a.d. 800. Between 300 and 400 years ago, the Puli was interbred with Western European herding dogs and and terriers to produce the Pumi. For years the Pumi was considered a regional variant of the Puli. This began to change in the early 20th century, when the standardization of the two breeds began.

Did You Know?

The Pumi has been assigned the Herding Group designation.
Today the Pumi is the most popular of the Hungarian herding dogs in Finland. The first Pumis were imported to Finland in 1972.
The name "Pumi" is first mentioned in 1815, describing a kind of sheep dog.
The Pumi originated in Hungary. There were over 2000 registrations in Hungary in the 1990s.
As of the September 2015 board meeting, the Pumi Club of America is the official parent club for the Pumi and to accept the Pumi into the AKC stud book on June 29, 2016. The breed will be eligible to compete in the Herding Group beginning July 1, 2016. The studbook will close on June 29, 2016.
As of the July 2007 board meeting, the Pumi was approved to compete in AKC Herding events for suffix titles effective January 1, 2008.
Pumis are very active, lively and energetic, always alert and ready to work with cattle and pigs as well as sheep.
The Pumi was first recorded in the Foundation Stock Service in 2001.
The Pumi was officially recognized by the AKC in 2016.
As of the May 2007 board meeting - the Pumi will be eligible to compete in companion events effective January 1, 2008.
As of the May 2010 board meeting, the Pumi will be eligible to compete in the Miscellaneous class, effective January 1, 2011.
As of the May 2011 board meeting, the Hungarian Pumi Club of America will serve as the AKC parent club to represent the Pumi.

The Breed Standard

The Pumi is a medium-sized alert, intelligent, energetic, and agile Hungarian herding breed, originating in the seventeenth or eighteenth centuries from the
ancestral Puli, and used to herd cattle, sheep, and swine. He is characterized by his square outline, curly coat, circular tail, and long head with semi-erect ears, and whimsical expression. The Pumi originated in Hungary where pastures were small and the livestock were driven to local fields for grazing. He is a versatile stock dog, equally adept at gathering, driving and keeping the stock within boundaries as directed by the shepherd, working very close to the livestock, and using his voice and quick movement to keep the stock under control.

HEAD

Long, with the muzzle 40 to 50 percent of the length of the head. The planes are parallel with a slight stop.
Expression is lively and intelligent.
Eyes are medium sized, dark brown, deep set, and oval, set moderately wide apart and slightly oblique. The pigment is dark and complete with tightly-fitting eye rims.
Ears are set on high, of medium size, and carried two-thirds erect with the tips pointing somewhat towards the sides. The ears are covered with hair, enhancing their whimsical expression. The ears are mobile and alert, moving quickly in reaction to any stimulation.
Disqualifications – Ears prick or hanging

BODY

The body is smooth and tight with hard, but not bulging muscles, and particularly lean. The back is short, straight, and taut. The loin is short, straight, and firmly coupled. The croup is not too long, slightly sloped, and of medium breadth. The chest is deep, fairly narrow, and extends well back to a moderate tuck-up. The ribs are slightly sprung with a deep brisket reaching to the elbows. The forechest is not pronounced. The depth of the chest is slightly less than 50 percent of the height at the withers.

FOREQUARTERS

The shoulders are moderately angulated, with long, well-knit shoulder blades and an upper arm matching in length. The angle formed between the shoulder blade and upper arm should be 100 to 110 degrees. The elbows are tucked firmly against the brisket. The legs are long and straight, with medium bone. The pastern is very slightly sloped. The feet are tight and round with well-knit toes – a cat foot, with well-cushioned pads. The nails are strong and preferably black or nearly black.

HINDQUARTERS

The hindquarters are well-developed and muscular, and in balance with the
forequarters having moderate angulation. The upper thigh is thick and strong, with a long, strong second thigh. The hocks are short, vertical, and parallel to each other. A vertical line can be drawn from the ischium down to the ground just in front of the rear toes when viewed from the side. Rear dewclaws, if any, may be removed. Hind feet same as the forefeet

COAT

The coat is a combination of wavy and curly hair, forming corkscrews or curls all over the body, and is never smooth or corded. The coat consists of an even mixture of harsh hair and softer undercoat. The coat stands out from the body approximately 1½ to 3 inches and is prepared using a combination of stripping and trimming. The eyes and the foreface are free of long hair. The hair on the underside of the tail ranges from ½ inch at its shortest to 3 to 5 inches
and has little undercoat. In order to achieve the characteristic corkscrews and curls in the coat, the hair is allowed to dry naturally. The coat must never appear fluffed and blown dry, obscuring the characteristic curls.

TAIL

Tail – set high, it arches over the back forming a full circle from base to tip, sitting just on top of the topline. In re-pose it may hang down. Docking is not permitted nor is a naturally short tail (stump).

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Colors & Markings

Colors

Description Standard Colors Registration Code
BLACK Check Mark For Standard Color 007
FAWN Check Mark For Standard Color 082
GRAY Check Mark For Standard Color 100
SILVER GRAY Check Mark For Standard Color 189
WHITE Check Mark For Standard Color 199
BORN BROWN 538
BORN GRAY 537

Markings

Description Standard Markings Registration Code
BLACK & TAN MARKINGS Check Mark For Standard Mark 039

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