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  • Temperament: Affectionate, Smart, Alert
  • AKC Breed Popularity: Ranks 18 of 194
  • Height: 10-12 inches
  • Weight: up to 30 pounds (male), up to 28 pounds (female)
  • Life Expectancy: 12-13 years
  • Group: Herding Group

    The AKC has grouped all of the breeds that it registers into seven categories, or groups, roughly based on function and heritage. Breeds are grouped together because they share traits of form and function or a common heritage.

Pembroke Welsh Corgi standing in three-quarter view facing forward
Pembroke Welsh Corgi head and shoulders facing left
Pembroke Welsh Corgi sitting facing left, head in three-quarter view
Pembroke Welsh Corgi coat detail
Pembroke Welsh Corgi lying in three-quarter view
Pembroke Welsh Corgi head in three-quarter view
Pembroke Welsh Corgi standing facing forward
Pembroke Welsh Corgi head and shoulders sitting facing left, head turned forward
Pembroke Welsh Corgi standing in three-quarter view
Pembroke Welsh Corgi head in three-quarter view
Pembroke Welsh Corgi

Find a Puppy: Pembroke Welsh Corgi

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GENERAL APPEARANCE

Low-set, strong, sturdily built and active, giving an impression of substance and stamina in a small space. Should not be so low and heavy-boned as to appear coarse or overdone, nor so light-boned as to appear racy. Outlook bold, but kindly. Expression intelligent and interested. Never shy nor vicious.

HEAD

The head should be foxy in shape and appearance. Expression – Intelligent and interested, but not sly. Skull – should be fairly wide and flat between the ears. Moderate amount of stop. Very slight rounding of cheek, not filled in below the eyes, as foreface should be nicely chiseled to give a somewhat tapered muzzle. Distance from occiput to center of stop to be greater than the distance from stop to nose tip, the proportion being five parts of total distance for the skull and three parts for the foreface. Muzzle should be neither dish-faced nor Roman-nosed.

BODY

Neck – Fairly long. Of sufficient length to provide over-all balance of the dog. Slightly arched, clean and blending well into the shoulders. A very short neck giving a stuffy appearance and a long, thin or ewe neck are faulty. Topline – Firm and level, neither riding up to nor falling away at the croup. A slight depression behind the shoulders caused by heavier neck coat meeting the shorter body coat is permissible. Body – Rib cage should be well sprung, slightly egg-shaped and moderately long. Deep chest, well let down between the forelegs. Exaggerated lowness interferes with the desired freedom of movement and should be penalized. Viewed from above, the body should taper slightly to end of loin. Loin short. Round or flat rib cage, lack of brisket, extreme length or cobbiness, are undesirable.

TAIL

Docked as short as possible without being indented. Occasionally a puppy is born with a natural dock, which if sufficiently short, is acceptable. A tail up to two inches in length is allowed, but if carried high tends to spoil the contour of the topline.

FOREQUARTERS

Legs – Short, forearms turned slightly inward, with the distance between wrists less than between the shoulder joints, so that the front does not appear absolutely straight. Ample bone carried right down into the feet. Pasterns firm and nearly straight when viewed from the side. Weak pasterns and knuckling over are serious faults. Shoulder blades long and well laid back along the rib cage. Upper arms nearly equal in length to shoulder blades. Elbows parallel to the body, not prominent, and well set back to allow a line perpendicular to the ground to be drawn from tip of the shoulder blade through to elbow.

COAT

Medium length; short, thick, weather- resistant undercoat with a coarser, longer outer coat. Over-all length varies, with slightly thicker and longer ruff around the neck, chest and on the shoulders. The body coat lies flat. Hair is slightly longer on back of forelegs and underparts and somewhat fuller and longer on rear of hindquarters. The coat is preferably straight, but some waviness is permitted. This breed has a shedding coat, and seasonal lack of undercoat should not be too severely penalized, providing the hair is glossy, healthy and well groomed. A wiry, tightly marcelled coat is very faulty, as is an overly short, smooth and thin coat. Very Serious Fault – Fluffies – a coat of extreme length with exaggerated feathering on ears, chest, legs and feet, underparts and hindquarters. Trimming such a coat does not make it any more acceptable. The Corgi should be shown in its natural condition, with no trimming permitted except to tidy the feet, and, if desired, remove the whiskers.

HINDQUARTERS

Ample bone, strong and flexible, moderately angulated at stifle and hock. Exaggerated angulation is as faulty as too little. Thighs should be well muscled. Hocks short, parallel, and when viewed from the side are perpendicular to the ground. Barrel hocks or cowhocks are most objectionable. Slipped or double-jointed hocks are very faulty. Feet – as in front.

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Pembroke Welsh Corgi

About the Pembroke Welsh Corgi

At 10 to 12 inches at the shoulder and 27 to 30 pounds, a well-built male Pembroke presents a big dog in a small package. Short but powerful legs, muscular thighs, and a deep chest equip him for a hard day’s work. Built long and low, Pembrokes are surprisingly quick and agile. They can be red, sable, fawn, and black and tan, with or without white markings.

The Pembroke is a bright, sensitive dog who enjoys play with his human family and responds well to training. As herders bred to move cattle, they are fearless and independent. They are vigilant watchdogs, with acute senses and a “big dog” bark. Families who can meet their bold but kindly Pembroke’s need for activity and togetherness will never have a more loyal, loving pet.

National Breed Clubs and Rescue

Want to connect with other people who love the same breed as much as you do? We have plenty of opportunities to get involved in your local community, thanks to AKC Breed Clubs located in every state, and more than 450 AKC Rescue Network groups across the country.
Pembroke Welsh Corgi

Find a Puppy: Pembroke Welsh Corgi

AKC Marketplace | PuppyFinder

AKC Marketplace is the only site to exclusively list 100% AKC puppies from AKC-Registered litters and the breeders who have cared for and raised these puppies are required to follow rules and regulations established by the AKC.
Find Pembroke Welsh Corgi Puppies

Care

NUTRITION

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi should do well on a high-quality dog food, whether commercially manufactured or home-prepared with your veterinarian’s supervision and approval. Any diet should be appropriate to the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior). Some dogs are prone to getting overweight, so watch your dog’s calorie consumption and weight level. Treats can be an important aid in training, but giving too many can cause obesity. Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.

GROOMING

The Pembroke has a thick, weatherproof double coat—a soft, light undercoat covered by a coarse outer coat. The breed sheds a fair amount on a daily basis, and even more so in the late spring/early summer. A daily once-over with a comb and a slicker brush will remove a lot of the shed hair before it is all over the house. During shedding season, baths help to loosen the dead hairs—the dog must be completely dry before brushing begins—and a rake helps strip out the undercoat. As with all breeds, the Corgi’s nails should be trimmed regularly, and ears checked to be sure they are clean and healthy.

Grooming Frequency

Occasional Bath/Brush
Specialty/Professional
Weekly Brushing

Shedding

Infrequent
Frequent
Regularly

EXERCISE

A strong, athletic little dog developed to herd cattle and other livestock, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi loves physical activity and is happiest when he has a job to do. Corgis benefit from moderate daily exercise to maintain their physical and mental health. Pembrokes can do well on long walks or slow jogs, but their short legs won’t allow them to keep up with a bicycle rider. Avoid extreme heat or cold, and always provide plenty of cool, fresh water after exercise. Many Pembrokes enjoy and excel at canine activities such as agility, herding, obedience, and tracking events.

Energy Level

Couch Potato
Needs Lots of Activity
Energetic

TRAINING

As with all breeds, early socialization and puppy training classes are strongly recommended. Gently exposing the puppy to a wide variety of people, places, and situations between the ages of 7 weeks and 4 months will help him develop into a well-adjusted, well-mannered adult. Pembrokes often have a mind of their own, but they are energetic, willing, and highly intelligent partners who respond well to training. Positive, reward-based training works best with this sensitive breed.

Trainability

May be Stubborn
Eager to Please
Agreeable

Temperament/Demeanor

Aloof/Wary
Outgoing
Outgoing

HEALTH

The Pembroke is typically a healthy breed, and responsible breeders screen their stock for health conditions such as elbow and hip dysplasia, eye disorders, cardiac issues, degenerative myelopathy, and von Willebrand’s disease, a bleeding disorder. As with all breeds, a Pembroke’s ears should be checked weekly for signs of infection, and the teeth should be brushed regularly.

Recommended Health Tests from the National Breed Club:

  • Hip Evaluation
  • Ophthalmologist Evaluation

Read the Official Breed Club Health Statement.

Pembroke Welsh Corgi
Pembroke Welsh Corgi
Pembroke Welsh Corgi
Pembroke Welsh Corgi
Pembroke Welsh Corgi
Pembroke Welsh Corgi

History

In medieval times, the kings of Europe advertised their majesty to their subjects and visiting emissaries by the richness of their possessions. Carpets, textiles, and tapestries were important factors in these displays of conspicuous consumption.

The era’s best weavers were centered in Flanders, now northern Belgium. It was common for monarchs to stage talent raids to induce Flemish weavers to relocate to their kingdoms. So it was that in the year 1107, Henry I of Britain invited a community of these master craftsmen to live and work in the southwestern Wales. The weavers accepted Henry’s invitation and brought all they needed to re-create their agrarian way of life in their new homeland. This included the dogs they bred to herd cattle and sheep. These sturdy, short-legged herders were the foundation for the breed we now know as the Pembroke Welsh Corgi.

The Pembroke has been a distinctly separate breed from his cousin the Cardigan Welsh Corgi since the late 1800s, but the two breeds often intermingled in the old Welsh breeding centers of Pembrokeshire and Cardiganshire. Today, the most noticeable differences between the breeds are the ears (the Pembroke’s are pointed and erect, the Cardi’s rounded) and the tail (the Cardi tale is much longer than the Pembroke’s).

The world’s most famous Pembroke fan is Elizabeth II. The queen got her first Pembroke, Dookie, in 1933 and has not been without one or more since.

Did You Know?

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is the younger of the two Corgi breeds and is a separate and distinct breed from the Cardigan.
The Pembroke is the more popular of the two Corgis.
The Pembroke has in its ancestry the Keeshond, Schipperke, Pomeranian, Samoyed, Chow-Chow, Norwegian Elkhound, and Finnish Spitz; it has little or nothing of Dachshund characteristics like the Cardigan.
The Pembroke, though the younger breed, can trace its origin to 1107 AD.
The direct ancestors of the Pembroke were brought across the channel by the Flemish weavers who had been induced by Henry I of England to take up their abode in Wales.

The Breed Standard

GENERAL APPEARANCE

Low-set, strong, sturdily built and active, giving an impression of substance and stamina in a small space. Should not be so low and heavy-boned as to appear coarse or overdone, nor so light-boned as to appear racy. Outlook bold, but kindly. Expression intelligent and interested. Never shy nor vicious.

HEAD

The head should be foxy in shape and appearance. Expression – Intelligent and interested, but not sly. Skull – should be fairly wide and flat between the ears. Moderate amount of stop. Very slight rounding of cheek, not filled in below the eyes, as foreface should be nicely chiseled to give a somewhat tapered muzzle. Distance from occiput to center of stop to be greater than the distance from stop to nose tip, the proportion being five parts of total distance for the skull and three parts for the foreface. Muzzle should be neither dish-faced nor Roman-nosed.

BODY

Neck – Fairly long. Of sufficient length to provide over-all balance of the dog. Slightly arched, clean and blending well into the shoulders. A very short neck giving a stuffy appearance and a long, thin or ewe neck are faulty. Topline – Firm and level, neither riding up to nor falling away at the croup. A slight depression behind the shoulders caused by heavier neck coat meeting the shorter body coat is permissible. Body – Rib cage should be well sprung, slightly egg-shaped and moderately long. Deep chest, well let down between the forelegs. Exaggerated lowness interferes with the desired freedom of movement and should be penalized. Viewed from above, the body should taper slightly to end of loin. Loin short. Round or flat rib cage, lack of brisket, extreme length or cobbiness, are undesirable.

TAIL

Docked as short as possible without being indented. Occasionally a puppy is born with a natural dock, which if sufficiently short, is acceptable. A tail up to two inches in length is allowed, but if carried high tends to spoil the contour of the topline.

FOREQUARTERS

Legs – Short, forearms turned slightly inward, with the distance between wrists less than between the shoulder joints, so that the front does not appear absolutely straight. Ample bone carried right down into the feet. Pasterns firm and nearly straight when viewed from the side. Weak pasterns and knuckling over are serious faults. Shoulder blades long and well laid back along the rib cage. Upper arms nearly equal in length to shoulder blades. Elbows parallel to the body, not prominent, and well set back to allow a line perpendicular to the ground to be drawn from tip of the shoulder blade through to elbow.

COAT

Medium length; short, thick, weather- resistant undercoat with a coarser, longer outer coat. Over-all length varies, with slightly thicker and longer ruff around the neck, chest and on the shoulders. The body coat lies flat. Hair is slightly longer on back of forelegs and underparts and somewhat fuller and longer on rear of hindquarters. The coat is preferably straight, but some waviness is permitted. This breed has a shedding coat, and seasonal lack of undercoat should not be too severely penalized, providing the hair is glossy, healthy and well groomed. A wiry, tightly marcelled coat is very faulty, as is an overly short, smooth and thin coat. Very Serious Fault – Fluffies – a coat of extreme length with exaggerated feathering on ears, chest, legs and feet, underparts and hindquarters. Trimming such a coat does not make it any more acceptable. The Corgi should be shown in its natural condition, with no trimming permitted except to tidy the feet, and, if desired, remove the whiskers.

HINDQUARTERS

Ample bone, strong and flexible, moderately angulated at stifle and hock. Exaggerated angulation is as faulty as too little. Thighs should be well muscled. Hocks short, parallel, and when viewed from the side are perpendicular to the ground. Barrel hocks or cowhocks are most objectionable. Slipped or double-jointed hocks are very faulty. Feet – as in front.

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Pembroke Welsh Corgi

Colors & Markings

Colors

Description Standard Colors Registration Code
BLACK & TAN Check Mark For Standard Color 018
FAWN Check Mark For Standard Color 082
RED Check Mark For Standard Color 140
SABLE Check Mark For Standard Color 164

Markings

Description Standard Markings Registration Code
WHITE MARKINGS Check Mark For Standard Mark 014

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