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  • Temperament: Courageous, Dignified, Calm
  • AKC Breed Popularity: Ranks 73 of 192
  • Height: 32 inches minimum (male), 30 inches minimum (female)
  • Weight: 120 pounds (male), 105 pounds (female)
  • Life Expectancy: 6-8 years
  • Group: Hound Group

    The AKC has grouped all of the breeds that it registers into seven categories, or groups, roughly based on function and heritage. Breeds are grouped together because they share traits of form and function or a common heritage.

Irish Wolfhound standing in a field
Irish Wolfhound sitting facing left
Irish Wolfhound head in three-quarter view
Irish Wolfhound standing sideways facing left, head turned forward.
Irish Wolfhound standing sideways facing left
Irish Wolfhound head facing left
Irish Wolfhound head facing right
Irish Wolfhound coat detail
Irish Wolfhound puppies sitting side by side outdoors.

Find a Puppy: Irish Wolfhound

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GENERAL APPEARANCE

Of great size and commanding appearance, the Irish Wolfhound is remarkable in combining power and swiftness with keen sight. The largest and tallest of the galloping hounds, in general type he is a rough-coated, Greyhound-like breed; very muscular, strong though gracefully built; movements easy and active; head and neck carried high, the tail carried with an upward sweep with a slight curve towards the extremity. The minimum height and weight of dogs should be 32 inches and 120 pounds; of bitches, 30 inches and 105 pounds; these to apply only to hounds over 18 months of age. Anything below this should be debarred from competition. Great size, including height at shoulder and proportionate length of body, is the desideratum to be aimed at, and it is desired to firmly establish a race that shall average from 32 to 34 inches in dogs, showing the requisite power, activity, courage and symmetry.

HEAD

Long, the frontal bones of the forehead very slightly raised and very little indentation between the eyes. Skull, not too broad. Muzzle, long and moderately pointed. Ears, small and Greyhound-like in carriage.

BODY

Neck: Rather long, very strong and muscular, well arched, without dewlap or loose skin about the throat. Chest: Very deep. Breast, wide. Back: Rather long than short. Loins arched.

FOREQUARTERS

Shoulders, muscular, giving breadth of chest, set sloping. Elbows well under, neither turned inwards nor outwards. Forearm muscular, and the whole leg strong and quite straight.

COAT

Rough and hard on body, legs and head; especially wiry and long over eyes and underjaw.

HINDQUARTERS

Muscular thighs and second thigh long and strong as in the Greyhound, and hocks well let down and turning neither in nor out. Feet are moderately large and round, neither turned inwards nor outwards. Toes, well arched and closed. Nails, very strong and curved.

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About the Irish Wolfhound

The amiable Irish Wolfhound is an immense, muscular hound gracefully built along classic Greyhound lines, capable of great speed at the gallop. A male might stand nearly 3 feet at the shoulder and weigh up to 180 pounds. Females will run smaller but are still a whole lot of hound. The rough, hard coat comes in many colors, including white, gray, brindle, red, black, and fawn.

IWs are too serene to be fierce guard dogs, but just the sight of them is enough to deter intruders. IWs are characteristically patient with kids, though animals their size should be supervised around small children. Owning an Irish Wolfhound is a unique, rewarding experience—but acquiring a giant galloping hound is a commitment as big as the dog itself.

National Breed Clubs and Rescue

Want to connect with other people who love the same breed as much as you do? We have plenty of opportunities to get involved in your local community, thanks to AKC Breed Clubs located in every state, and more than 450 AKC Rescue Network groups across the country.
Irish Wolfhound puppies sitting side by side outdoors.

Find a Puppy: Irish Wolfhound

AKC Marketplace | PuppyFinder

AKC Marketplace is the only site to exclusively list 100% AKC puppies from AKC-Registered litters and the breeders who have cared for and raised these puppies are required to follow rules and regulations established by the AKC.
Find Irish Wolfhound Puppies

Care

NUTRITION

A high-quality dog food appropriate for the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior) and ideally formulated for large breeds should have all the nutrients the Irish Wolfhound needs. Because of the risk of bloat, strenuous exercise is not recommended before or after feeding time. Check with the dog’s breeder and your vet if you have any questions or concerns about your dog’s weight, diet, or feeding schedule.

GROOMING

Irish Wolfhounds have a double coat that consists of a harsh, wiry outer coat covering a soft undercoat. They shed throughout the year, but not to an excessive degree. A thorough brushing once a week or so will help to remove dirt and loose hair and keep the dog looking his best. Unlike many double-coated breeds, Irish Wolfhounds don’t “blow out” their coats during an annual or semi-annual shedding season. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can be painful to the dog and cause problems walking and running.

Grooming Frequency

Occasional Bath/Brush
Specialty/Professional
Weekly Brushing

Shedding

Infrequent
Frequent
Seasonal

EXERCISE

Wolfhounds need exercise throughout their lives. Because they retain a strong instinct to hunt and chase prey, they should only be allowed loose in areas that are securely fenced, and any walks must be taken on a leash. As adults, Irish Wolfhounds can become couch potatoes if allowed to, but regular exercise such as long walks or play sessions will help keep them physically and mentally healthy. A home with a fairly large fenced area is necessary to provide the kind of environment in which they can thrive. The breed can also exercise mind and body by participating in canine sports like trackingagility, and lure coursing.

Energy Level

Couch Potato
Needs Lots of Activity
Regular Exercise

TRAINING

Wolfhound puppies take 18 months or more to mature, and they can be very destructive, and possibly prone to injuring themselves, when left alone for extended periods. Puppies should have reasonable access to age-appropriate free play, but not with adult dogs, and with no forced exercise. Early socialization and puppy training classes (using positive training methods only) are recommended. Because of their intelligence, Irish Wolfhounds are fast learners. Wolfhounds crave the company of their people, and their sensitivity to humans makes them excellent candidates for therapy work.

Trainability

May be Stubborn
Eager to Please
Independent

Temperament/Demeanor

Aloof/Wary
Outgoing
Alert/Responsive

HEALTH

Like other large and deep-chested breeds, Wolfhounds can experience bloat, a sudden and life-threatening swelling of the abdomen, and owners should educate themselves about its symptoms and what to do should bloat occur. Responsible breeders will screen their breeding stock for health and genetic conditions such as pneumonia, heart disease, certain cancers and liver shunt. An annual examination, preferably by a veterinarian familiar with sighthounds, is recommended and should include an EKG. Extensive health information is available on the sites of the AKC breed club, the Irish Wolfhound Club of America, and its sister health organization, the Irish Wolfhound Foundation.

Recommended Health Tests from the National Breed Club:

  • Hip Evaluation
  • Elbow Evaluation
  • Ophthalmologist Evaluation
  • Cardiac Exam

Read the Official Breed Club Health Statement.

Irish Wolfhound
Irish Wolfhound
Irish Wolfhound
Irish Wolfhound
Irish Wolfhound
Irish Wolfhound

History

The Wolfhound’s long history goes back to antiquity and over the centuries has acquired a patina of myth and legend. It can be reliably stated, however, that they were created by breeding the indigenous large dogs of Britain to the Middle Eastern coursing hounds that were bartered around the known world in the earliest days of international trade.

By the time the Roman Empire had gained a toehold in the British Isles, the giant hounds of Ireland were already long established. In the year 391 the Roman consul received a gift of seven of these hounds that “all Rome viewed with wonder.” These majestic hunters, whose motto was “Gentle when stroked, fierce when provoked,” were used on such quarry as the now-extinct Irish elk, a massive, ferocious beast said to stand six feet at the shoulder.

In 15th-century Ireland, wolves were overrunning the countryside. The Irish hounds, already renowned big-game hunters, began to specialize on wolves. By the late 1700s, when wolves and other big-game animals of Ireland were hunted to extinction, IWs lost their job and nearly went extinct themselves. This was a case of a breed doing its job too well for its own good.

In 1862, British army captain George Augustus Graham began scouring the country for remaining specimens of Ireland’s national hound. Graham made it his life’s work to protect, standardize, and promote the breed, and today his name is still spoken with reverence wherever IW fanciers gather.

Among the many Irish legends inspired by the breed is the melancholy tale of loyalty and remorse “Gelert, the Faithful Hound.”

Did You Know?

Irish Wolfhounds are called, interchangeably, "Irish dogs," "Big Dogs of Ireland," "Greyhounds (or Grehounds) of Ireland," "Wolfdogs of Ireland" and "Great Hounds of Ireland." Irish Wolfhound is the more modern name.
By the year 391 AD, the Irish Wolfhound was known in Rome, when the first authentic mention of it was written by the Roman Consul Quintus Aurelius, who had received seven of them as a gift which "all Rome viewed with wonder."
Despite his intimidating size, the nature and temperament of the Wolfhound make him totally unsuitable as guard dog, watch dog, or patrol dog. Though alert he is not suspicious; though courageous he is not aggressive.
Wolfhound puppyhood lasts a year or more, and a Wolfhound "puppy" can weigh about 100 lbs.
The Irish Wolfhound was coveted for his hunting prowess, particularly in pursuit of the wolf and the gigantic Irish elk. However, with the disappearance from Ireland of these animals, and the excessive exportation of the Wolfhound, the breed became almost extinct.

The Breed Standard

GENERAL APPEARANCE

Of great size and commanding appearance, the Irish Wolfhound is remarkable in combining power and swiftness with keen sight. The largest and tallest of the galloping hounds, in general type he is a rough-coated, Greyhound-like breed; very muscular, strong though gracefully built; movements easy and active; head and neck carried high, the tail carried with an upward sweep with a slight curve towards the extremity. The minimum height and weight of dogs should be 32 inches and 120 pounds; of bitches, 30 inches and 105 pounds; these to apply only to hounds over 18 months of age. Anything below this should be debarred from competition. Great size, including height at shoulder and proportionate length of body, is the desideratum to be aimed at, and it is desired to firmly establish a race that shall average from 32 to 34 inches in dogs, showing the requisite power, activity, courage and symmetry.

HEAD

Long, the frontal bones of the forehead very slightly raised and very little indentation between the eyes. Skull, not too broad. Muzzle, long and moderately pointed. Ears, small and Greyhound-like in carriage.

BODY

Neck: Rather long, very strong and muscular, well arched, without dewlap or loose skin about the throat. Chest: Very deep. Breast, wide. Back: Rather long than short. Loins arched.

FOREQUARTERS

Shoulders, muscular, giving breadth of chest, set sloping. Elbows well under, neither turned inwards nor outwards. Forearm muscular, and the whole leg strong and quite straight.

COAT

Rough and hard on body, legs and head; especially wiry and long over eyes and underjaw.

HINDQUARTERS

Muscular thighs and second thigh long and strong as in the Greyhound, and hocks well let down and turning neither in nor out. Feet are moderately large and round, neither turned inwards nor outwards. Toes, well arched and closed. Nails, very strong and curved.

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Colors & Markings

Colors

Description Standard Colors Registration Code
Black Check Mark For Standard Color 007
Blue Check Mark For Standard Color 037
Brindle Check Mark For Standard Color 057
Cream Check Mark For Standard Color 076
Gray Check Mark For Standard Color 100
Gray & Brindle Check Mark For Standard Color 102
Red Check Mark For Standard Color 140
Red & Brindle Check Mark For Standard Color 142
Red Wheaten Check Mark For Standard Color 156
Silver Check Mark For Standard Color 176
Wheaten Check Mark For Standard Color 224
Wheaten & Brindle Check Mark For Standard Color 225
White Check Mark For Standard Color 199

Markings

Description Standard Markings Registration Code
Black Markings 002
Gray Markings 028
White Markings 014

Other Breeds to Explore

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