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  • Temperament: Loyal, Intelligent, Active
  • Height: Minimum: 23.5-25.5 inches
  • Weight: Minimum: 44-57 pounds
  • Life Expectancy: 10-15 years
  • Group: Foundation Stock Service

    The AKC has grouped all of the breeds that it registers into seven categories, or groups, roughly based on function and heritage. Breeds are grouped together because they share traits of form and function or a common heritage.

Breed Standard
Czechoslovakian Vlcak standing in three-quarter view

About the Czechoslovakian Vlcak

The Czechoslovakian Vlcak (CSV) was originally bred for working border patrol in Czechoslovakia in the 1950s. They are currently used in Europe and the United States for search and rescue, tracking, obedience, agility, drafting, herding, and working dog sports. The CSV is bred for versatility and hardiness in harsh elements and arelargeore independent in nature than many other working breeds. They are an excellent choice for tracking or trailing sport/work, or as a companion for active owners who enjoy spending time doing outdoor activities such as biking, running, or hiking. They are not, however, recommended for first time owners.

Club Contact Details

Club:  Czechoslovakian Vlcak Club of America
Name: Stacy McCrary, President
Email: My3sonstx@aol.com

Breed Clubs and Rescue

Want to connect with other people who love the same breed as much as you do? We have plenty of opportunities to get involved in your local community, thanks to AKC Breed Clubs located in every state, and more than 450 AKC Rescue Network groups across the country.
Czechoslovakian Vlcak

Find a Puppy: Czechoslovakian Vlcak

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Care

NUTRITION

A raw diet is preferable for the Czechoslovakian Vlcak, but a high quality, grain-free kibble with raw supplements is also acceptable. Many dog food companies have breed-specific formulas for small, medium, large and extra-large breeds. Czechoslovakian Vlcaks are a medium-sized breed.

What you feed your dog is an individual choice, but working with your veterinarian and/or breeder will be the best way to determine frequency of meals as a puppy and the best adult diet to increase his longevity. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.

GROOMING

Czechoslovakian Vlcaks have a weather resistant coat; it naturally cleans itself of mud and dirt. They seldom need a bath and have little to no body odor. They shed twice-a-year and at that time daily brushing is required. The winter coat is thicker, heavier and longer than the shorter, thinner summer coat and this may require more grooming during the colder months of the year. Their strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

Grooming Frequency

Occasional Bath/Brush
Specialty/Professional
Weekly Brushing

Shedding

Infrequent
Frequent
Frequent

EXERCISE

This breed is known for having boundless energy, especially during puppyhood and young adolescence. Daily long walks/runs combined with mental stimulation work well. Turning them out into the back yard by themselves does not work. A Vlcak does best when they have a “meaningful” job they can devote themselves to. They like to have an interactive experience with their owners. Activities like swimming, hiking, retrieving balls or flying discs can provide a good outlet for expending energy. A CSV may have prey drive towards small animals, so fenced enclosures and/or on-leash are always a good idea.

Energy Level

Couch Potato
Needs Lots of Activity
Needs Lots of Activity

TRAINING

The Czechoslovakian Vlcak is a primitive breed of dog with a dominant and independent personality and so requires a different approach to training. Consistency and patience is a must. The CSV is confident, lively, active, high stamina, high energy, tough and obedient with quick reactions. They are also highly intelligent, versatile and curious. Early socialization and training is very important. With proper training, Vlcaks can excel in many different types of activities, but they need to see a purpose for the desired task. They bore very easily, do not like to do repetitive tasks and often refuse to perform the tasks regardless of treat incentives. Positive reinforcement training methods are highly recommended. The Czechoslovakian Vlcak is not recommended for first time owners as they need strong pack leadership and structure.

Trainability

May be Stubborn
Eager to Please
May be Stubborn

Temperament/Demeanor

Aloof/Wary
Outgoing
Aloof/Wary

HEALTH

Czechoslovakian Vlcaks are a very healthy and robust breed.  It is wise to ask the breeder what health concerns they have seen in each genetic line.

 

Recommended Health Test from Parent Club

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Elbow Dysplasia
  • Degenerative Myelopathy
  • Eye Examination by boarded ACVO Ophthalmologist
  • DNA Repository
  • Dentition (full)
  • Cardiac Evaluation (Optional)
  • Autoimmune Thyroiditis (Optional)
  • Pituitary Dwarfism DNA Test (Optional)
Czechoslovakian-Vlcak
Czechoslovakian-Vlcak
Czechoslovakian-Vlcak
Czechoslovakian-Vlcak
Czechoslovakian-Vlcak
Czechoslovakian-Vlcak

History

In 1955, a biological experiment took place in the CSSR of that time, namely, the crossing of a German Shepherd Dog with a Carpathian Wolf. The experiment established that the progeny of the mating of a male dog to a female wolf as well as that of male wolf to female dog, could be reared. The overwhelming majority of the products of these matings possessed the genetic requirements for continuation of breeding. In 1965, after ending the experiment, a plan for the breeding of this new breed was worked out. This was to combine the usable qualities of the wolf with the favorable qualities of the dog. In 1982, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog, through the general committee of the breeder’s associations of the CSSR of that time, was recognized as a national breed.

Did You Know?

The Czechoslovakian Vlcak has been assigned the Working Group designation.
The Czechoslovakian Vlcak is also known as the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog, the Ceskoslovensky Vlciak (Slovakia), or the Ceskoslovensky Vlcak (Czech Republic).
The Czechoslovakian Vlcak was created from crosses between German Shepherds and Carpathian wolves.
The first unofficial gathering of Czechoslovakian Vlcaks and their owners took place amongst 7 owners and 6 Vlcaks in the summer of 2008 in Wintergreen, Virginia.
Czechoslovakian Vlcaks generally love water and snow.
Although some Czechoslovakian Vlcaks do bark, most Vlcaks have to be taught to bark, which can be a difficult command to teach.
Some Czechoslovakian Vlcaks howl and others make many other vocalizations besides barking.
The Czechoslovakian Vlcak has been recorded in the AKC Foundation Stock Service since 2001.
Czechoslovakian Vlcaks have been able to compete in AKC Companion Events since January 1, 2010.
The average litter size is 6-7 puppies and most litters are born in the winter.
Many Czechoslovakian Vlcaks pass endurance tests in which they run beside a bicycle. The longest test is 60 miles (100 km) run in 8 hours!
Many females come into heat after their first birthday and only once a year after that.
In October 2011, the group designation for the Czechoslovakian Vlcak was changed from Herding to Working per a request from the Czechoslovakian Vlcak Club of America.