Neapolitan MastiffCare

The coat is an easy keeper; wrinkles must be kept clean and dry; keep a drool towel handy.

Well-bred and socialized Mastini are steady and loyal to their own families but protective around strangers. Due to the breed’s size, strength and temperament, experts do not recommend a Neapolitan Mastiff for first-time dog owners or families with young children. They should receive some form of daily exercise, but beware that they don’t overdo it in hot weather. Their short coats are easy to care for, but potential owners should not be afraid of a little drool!

nutrition &FEEDING

Depending on the size of your dog as an adult you are going to want to feed them a formula that will cater to their unique digestive needs through the various phases of their life. Many dog food companies have breed-specific formulas for small, medium, large and giant breeds. The Neapolitan Mastiffs is a giant breed and has a lifespan of 8 to 10 years.

What you feed your dog is an individual choice, but working with your veterinarian and/or breeder will be the best way to determine frequency of meals as a puppy and the best adult diet to increase his longevity. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.

coat &GROOMING

With regular weekly grooming and the occasional bath they will keep clean and looking their best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your pet. Their strong fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

coat length Short
grooming Occasional Grooming

energy &EXERCISE

Well-bred and socialized Mastini are steady and loyal to their own families but protective around strangers. Due to the breed’s size, strength and temperament, experts do not recommend a Neapolitan Mastiff for first-time dog owners or families with young children. The young Mastino grows very rapidly. It is a mistake to play roughly with a young Mastino or to encourage the young dog to run extensively. First of all, these large animals overheat easily. Secondly, overly vigorous exercise can damage the very rapidly growing bones and joints. Let the dog be the leader in the kinds and types of play. Take the Mastino for walks and do let the dog play in the yard as long as he or she seems untroubled. Just stop well before the dog shows it is tired. Mastini have been known to be extremely stoic dogs, and they often ignore pain. This means that the dog may try to participate in play or exercise beyond the point where they should. The national breed club encourages basic obedience for all Mastini when they are old enough to tolerate a 10-20 minute lesson once or twice every day—about 4 months of age. If you haven’t taught your 40 or 60 pound baby “Sit” or“Down” or “Off” or “Come,” you will find it very much harder to teach these commands to your wild 100+ pound adolescent.

energy level Some Exercise

Neapolitan Mastiff &HEALTH

Like all breeds there may be some health issues, like hip and elbow dysplasia, eye disease, and cardiac disease. One minor problem that often occurs is “cherry eye.” Tissue in the corner of the eye becomes red and inflamed. This looks terrible, but is cured with a minor veterinarian procedure. Despite impressive wrinkles and loose skin, they should not have skin problems. Young Mastini grow very rapidly for the first year or so, and they can develop temporary problems related to this rapid growth, such as panosteitis (growing pains). Talk to your breeder and your veterinarian about these sorts of problems. There are health problems that are common in giant dogs and the Mastino is not immune.

Bloat is a mysterious problem of all deep-chested breeds. And as with all breeds, especially the larger ones, the Mastino can develop hip dysplasia. This is another topic to be discussed with your breeder and your veterinarian. Some dogs may be faced with these health challenges in their lives, but the majority of Neapolitan Mastiffs are healthy dogs. Working with a responsible breeder, those wishing to own a Neapolitan Mastiff can gain the education they need to know about specific health concerns within the breed. Good breeders utilize genetic testing of their breeding stock to reduce the likelihood of disease in their puppies.