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  • Temperament: Friendly, Confident, Bold
  • AKC Breed Popularity: Ranks 145 of 192
  • Height: 14-15 inches (male), slightly smaller (female)
  • Weight: 17 pounds (male), slightly smaller (female)
  • Life Expectancy: 12-15 years
  • Group: Terrier Group

    The AKC has grouped all of the breeds that it registers into seven categories, or groups, roughly based on function and heritage. Breeds are grouped together because they share traits of form and function or a common heritage.

Lakeland Terrier head and shoulders facing left
Lakeland Terrier sitting in three-quarter view, head turned left
Lakeland Terrier standing in three-quarter view, head turned forward
Lakeland Terrier coat detail

GENERAL APPEARANCE

The Lakeland Terrier is a small, workmanlike dog of square, sturdy build. His body is deep and relatively narrow, which allows him to squeeze into rocky dens. He has sufficient length of leg under him to cover rough ground easily. His neck is long, leading smoothly into high withers and a short topline ending in a high tail set. His attitude is gay, friendly, and self-confident, but not overly aggressive. He is alert and ready to go. His movement is lithe and graceful, with a straight-ahead, free stride of good length. His head is rectangular, jaws are powerful, and ears are V-shaped. A dense, wiry coat is finished off with longer furnishings on muzzle and legs.

HEAD

The head is well balanced, rectangular, the length of skull equaling the length of the muzzle when measured from occiput to stop, and from stop to nose tip.

BODY

The body is strong and supple. The moderately narrow oval chest is deep, extending to the elbows. The ribs are well sprung and moderately rounded off the vertebrae. The Lakeland Terrier is a breed of moderation.

FOREQUARTERS

The shoulders are well angulated. An imaginary line drawn from the top of the shoulder blade should pass through the elbow. The shoulder blade is long in proportion to the upper arm, which allows for reasonable angulation while maintaining the more upright “terrier front.” The musculature of the shoulders is flat and smooth. The elbows are held close to the body, standing or moving. The forelegs are strong, clean and straight when viewed from the front or side. There is no appreciable bend at the pasterns. The feet are round and point forward, the toes compact and strong. The pads are thick and black or dark gray, except in liver colored dogs where they are brown. The nails are strong and may be black or self-colored. Dewclaws are removed.

COAT

Two-ply or double, the outer coat is hard and wiry in texture, the undercoat is close to the skin and soft and should never overpower the wiry outer coat. The Lakeland is hand stripped to show his outline. (Clipping is inappropriate for the show ring.) The appearance should be neat and workmanlike. The coat on the skull, ears, forechest, shoulders and behind the tail is trimmed short and smooth. The coat on the body is longer (about one-half to one inch) and may be slightly wavy or straight. The furnishings on the legs and foreface are plentiful as opposed to profuse and should be tidy. They are crisp in texture. The legs should appear cylindrical. The face is traditionally trimmed, with the hair left longer over the eyes to give the head a rectangular appearance from all angles, with the eyes covered from above. From the front, the eyes are quite apparent, giving the Lakeland his own unique mischievous expression.

HINDQUARTERS

The thighs are powerful and well muscled. The hind legs are well angulated, but not so much as to affect the balance between front and rear, which allows for smooth efficient movement. The stifles turn neither in nor out. The distance from the hock to the ground is relatively short and the line from the hock to toes is straight when viewed from the side. From the rear the hocks are parallel to each other. Feet same as front. Dewclaws, if any, are removed.

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About the Lakeland Terrier

Square and sturdy Lakelands, standing less than 15 inches at the shoulder and weighing about 17 pounds, are small dogs. But don’t tell them that. With their cock-of-the-walk swagger, Lakelands personify the old dog-lover’s cliché “a big dog in a small package.” They come in several colors; some have a sporty saddle mark on the back.

With folded V-shaped ears, straight front, rectangular head, and a mischievous twinkle in their eye, Lakelands are the blueprint of a long-legged British terrier.

Breed Clubs and Rescue

Want to connect with other people who love the same breed as much as you do? We have plenty of opportunities to get involved in your local community, thanks to AKC Breed Clubs located in every state, and more than 450 AKC Rescue Network groups across the country.
Lakeland Terrier

Find a Puppy: Lakeland Terrier

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Care

NUTRITION

A high-quality dog food appropriate to the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior) should provide the nutrients the dog needs. Some experienced owners recommend that the some raw bone be given to this and related terrier breeds; ask the vet or the dog’s breeder if there are any questions about the dog’s weight or diet. Clean, fresh water should always be available.

GROOMING

Lakelands have a beautiful, harsh double coat when maintained properly by hand plucking. Finding someone who can pluck (or “strip”) a coat is difficult, however. Clippering the coat will also suffice, but with this the color and texture of the coat will fade. Once clipped the coat becomes soft, with loose curls. The hairs tend to not drop out, instead staying caught up in the coat, so the Lakeland is considered a non-shedding breed suitable for people who can’t tolerate lots of dander. Brushing weekly will help to remove the loose hairs and prevent mats.

Grooming Frequency

Occasional Bath/Brush
Specialty/Professional
Weekly Brushing

EXERCISE

When raised properly, Lakelands are not a hyperactive breed. A good, long walk or brisk jog daily along with frequent opportunities to run in a securely fenced area should keep them fit both physically and mentally. One longtime breeder notes: “Physically, Lakelands can get enough exercise if they live in a two-story house. Mentally, they need to get a lot of exercise to grow up sane. Walks on short leads don’t cut it. All-out running on a 20- or 30-foot line regularly seems necessary.”

Energy Level

Couch Potato
Needs Lots of Activity
Regular Exercise

TRAINING

The Lakeland needs early socialization, following up with a good basic puppy training class—with the class and trainer chosen carefully. A longtime breeder notes: “Avoid training classes taught by people who do not understand the terrier mind. Lakelands are wicked smart; they learn quickly, and get bored quickly. Make the right thing easy and the wrong thing difficult, and reward good choices.” They learn fast but don’t thrive on repetitive training—they are simply too smart to perform the same task over and over again.

Trainability

May be Stubborn
Eager to Please
Agreeable

Temperament/Demeanor

Aloof/Wary
Outgoing
Alert/Responsive

HEALTH

There are very few breed health conditions specific to the Lakeland Terrier, and none that have been reported at more than a very low incidence. As with all breeds, a Lakeland’s ears should be checked regularly for signs of infection, and the teeth should be brushed often, using a toothpaste designed for dogs.

Recommended Health Tests from the National Breed Club:

No recommended health tests

Read the Official Breed Club Health Statement.

Lakeland Terrier
Lakeland Terrier
Lakeland Terrier
Lakeland Terrier
Lakeland Terrier
Lakeland Terrier

History

Lakelands are among the oldest of Britain’s terriers. The name derives from the beautiful Lake District in northern England, where once upon a time farmers used small packs of dogs to rid their property of foxes that raided sheepfolds. This, of course, was a very different kind of English foxhunt than the glamorous affairs on grand country estates, with dozens of red-coated equestrians and huge packs of bawling hounds. The Lakeland was first and foremost workingman’s working terrier.

Did You Know?

One of two dogs to win both Westminster in New York and Crufts in London was a Lakeland Terrier named Champion Stingray of Derryabah (1967).
The breed has been known by a variety of names including Patterdale, Fell, Cumberland and Westmoreland terrier.
The Lakeland Terrier was accepted for registration in the AKC stud book in 1934.
The breed is derived from the Welsh Terrier from the now extinct Old English Black and Tan Terrier. Other breeds including Wire Fox Terrier, Border Terrier, Bedlington Terriers and the early Dandie Dinmonts are believed to have contributed to the breed's development.
The birthplace of the Lakeland Terrier is Cumberland County in England.

The Breed Standard

GENERAL APPEARANCE

The Lakeland Terrier is a small, workmanlike dog of square, sturdy build. His body is deep and relatively narrow, which allows him to squeeze into rocky dens. He has sufficient length of leg under him to cover rough ground easily. His neck is long, leading smoothly into high withers and a short topline ending in a high tail set. His attitude is gay, friendly, and self-confident, but not overly aggressive. He is alert and ready to go. His movement is lithe and graceful, with a straight-ahead, free stride of good length. His head is rectangular, jaws are powerful, and ears are V-shaped. A dense, wiry coat is finished off with longer furnishings on muzzle and legs.

HEAD

The head is well balanced, rectangular, the length of skull equaling the length of the muzzle when measured from occiput to stop, and from stop to nose tip.

BODY

The body is strong and supple. The moderately narrow oval chest is deep, extending to the elbows. The ribs are well sprung and moderately rounded off the vertebrae. The Lakeland Terrier is a breed of moderation.

FOREQUARTERS

The shoulders are well angulated. An imaginary line drawn from the top of the shoulder blade should pass through the elbow. The shoulder blade is long in proportion to the upper arm, which allows for reasonable angulation while maintaining the more upright “terrier front.” The musculature of the shoulders is flat and smooth. The elbows are held close to the body, standing or moving. The forelegs are strong, clean and straight when viewed from the front or side. There is no appreciable bend at the pasterns. The feet are round and point forward, the toes compact and strong. The pads are thick and black or dark gray, except in liver colored dogs where they are brown. The nails are strong and may be black or self-colored. Dewclaws are removed.

COAT

Two-ply or double, the outer coat is hard and wiry in texture, the undercoat is close to the skin and soft and should never overpower the wiry outer coat. The Lakeland is hand stripped to show his outline. (Clipping is inappropriate for the show ring.) The appearance should be neat and workmanlike. The coat on the skull, ears, forechest, shoulders and behind the tail is trimmed short and smooth. The coat on the body is longer (about one-half to one inch) and may be slightly wavy or straight. The furnishings on the legs and foreface are plentiful as opposed to profuse and should be tidy. They are crisp in texture. The legs should appear cylindrical. The face is traditionally trimmed, with the hair left longer over the eyes to give the head a rectangular appearance from all angles, with the eyes covered from above. From the front, the eyes are quite apparent, giving the Lakeland his own unique mischievous expression.

HINDQUARTERS

The thighs are powerful and well muscled. The hind legs are well angulated, but not so much as to affect the balance between front and rear, which allows for smooth efficient movement. The stifles turn neither in nor out. The distance from the hock to the ground is relatively short and the line from the hock to toes is straight when viewed from the side. From the rear the hocks are parallel to each other. Feet same as front. Dewclaws, if any, are removed.

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Colors & Markings

Colors

Description Standard Colors Registration Code
BLACK Check Mark For Standard Color 007
BLACK & TAN Check Mark For Standard Color 018
BLUE Check Mark For Standard Color 037
BLUE & TAN Check Mark For Standard Color 044
GRIZZLE & TAN Check Mark For Standard Color 110
LIVER Check Mark For Standard Color 123
RED Check Mark For Standard Color 140
RED GRIZZLE Check Mark For Standard Color 154
WHEATEN Check Mark For Standard Color 224
BRINDLE 057
GRIZZLE 109
LIVER & TAN 124

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