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Dalmatian licking a treat off a stick.
Courtesy of Osterland / stock.adobe.com

When I was a child, I never ate an ice cream cone without giving the final bite to my dog. He loved sharing my cold treats, but I didn’t realize it wasn’t the best choice for his health. Ice cream can be hard for dogs to digest because milk and cream are the base of most ice cream recipes. And for some dogs, the lactose in dairy can cause stomach upset and other digestive issues like gas or diarrhea. Not to mention that too many sweet treats can lead to weight gain. But hot summer days were made for ice cream. Instead of leaving your dog out of the frozen fun at a picnic or your family BBQ, here are some recipes for ice cream alternatives your dog is sure to lap up with joy. Feed in moderation, and feel free to modify the recipes with other dog-safe foods.

Hide and Seek Ice Cubes

Any dog-safe tasty liquid can be turned into a frozen treat. Simply pour into an ice cube tray and freeze so your dog can have a cube or two whenever you like. Consider your dog’s taste buds and try something meat-flavored like no salt added beef broth or chicken stock. For an extra-special indulgence, create hide and seek treats. First, only fill the trays halfway before freezing the liquid. Once frozen, place a small treat like a blueberry or piece of freeze-dried liver in the middle of the cube then fill the rest of the tray with the remaining liquid. Once the entire cube is frozen, there will be a tasty surprise waiting inside when your dog licks or chomps the ice.

For a longer-lasting treat, consider filling your dog’s hollow rubber toy. Just be sure to block all the openings but one before pouring in the liquid. You can use a hard treat like a cookie as a cork or plug holes with peanut butter. After filling, stand the toy upright in the freezer until the liquid is ice. Not only will the chilly toy cool down your dog on a hot day, the work it takes to get every last drop of broth will keep your dog busy and provide mental stimulation.

Soft Serve Treats

For an ice cream alternative with the same texture and consistency as the real thing, try blending frozen fruit with yogurt. Watermelon is safe for dogs and most love it, so it makes a perfect choice for this recipe. Cantaloupe is another excellent option, just remove the rind. First, cut the fruit into bite-size chunks, removing any seeds as you go. Then place the fruit in the freezer for at least four hours until frozen. If you spread out the chunks on a cookie sheet or in a freezer bag it will prevent them from freezing into a single clump. Once the fruit is frozen, place in a food processor or blender with about ¼ cup of yogurt for every 2 cups of fruit. Blend until smooth, tweaking the amount of fruit and yogurt until you have the thickness you would like. Place in a bowl, on top of your dog’s dinner, or stuff in a hollow rubber toy and serve right away.

Feeding frozen yogurt may seem no different than feeding your dog ice cream. However, unless they suffer from lactose intolerance, yogurt is safe to eat for most dogs. It’s usually better tolerated than ice cream, plus the bacterial cultures in yogurt are great for intestinal health. Just be sure to choose plain yogurt without added sugars or artificial sweeteners. However, if your dog doesn’t handle yogurt well, consider other options like lactose-free, dairy-based yogurt or dairy-free yogurt made from plant products. Coconut milk can also be used if liquid is needed to thin out a recipe.

summer picnic with dog

Frozen Pupsicles on a Stick

For a frozen fruit smoothie on a stick, make bananas the foundation of your dog’s chilly treat. Slice a few bananas then freeze the pieces for several hours. Next, mix the fruit with a few spoonfuls of yogurt in a food processor until you have a smooth base with the thickness of a milkshake. Now you can blend in whatever mix-ins your dog would love. Consider bacon bits for a meaty treat, frozen strawberries and blueberries for a red, white, and blue celebration, pumpkin puree for a fall-themed goodie, or tuna for some surfside fun. When all the ingredients are blended together, pour into ice pop molds or paper cups, insert a “stick” in the middle and freeze.

To release the pupsicles from the molds, let them sit at room temperature for a few minutes or run warm water over the mold for a few seconds. If you use paper cups, simply peel the paper off before serving. If you have a toy breed, try mini water cups instead of full-size drinking cups.

For the pupsicle sticks, you have many options. You can use bone-shaped dog cookies, salmon skin rolls, bully sticks, or any other long edible chew. For a safe yet non-edible stick, consider nylon chew bones. The stick will give your dog something to hold on to while licking and chewing the pupsicle. Plus, chewing the stick will provide even more fun for your dog when the smoothie is gone.

Cold and Sticky

Peanut butter is safe for dogs and unsalted, all-natural varieties are a great addition to frozen dog treats. The stickiness of the peanut butter gives recipes a thick, ice-cream-like texture. Mix a small amount with yogurt and fruit or blend it with mashed bananas to add extra flavor and density to the final treat. If the peanut butter is too thick for the blender, warm it first or add some liquid such as meat broth to the mix.

You can also make peanut butter the star ingredient. Simply layer peanut butter in the bottom half of ice cube trays, ice pop molds, or paper cups. Then top off with a layer of yogurt or meat broth and freeze. Pop the layered frozen treat out of the tray or mold or peel off the paper cup before serving. For fun icy treats, consider using silicone baking molds in exciting shapes like dog bones or dinosaurs. The peanut butter should slide right out of the mold once it’s frozen, and your dog will love cooling down with a cold and sticky treat.

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