Celebrating Filmmaker and Friend to Dogs Daniel Anker

Just a few years ago, Academy Award nominated filmmaker Daniel Anker made Icebound, a wonderful movie about the famous 700-mile sled dog relay that delivered serum to victims of a deadly diphtheria outbreak in Nome, Alaska, in 1925.  Tragically he died a few days ago at just 50.

Danny reached out to AKC and our clubs for help with research while making his film, and he was a great friend of AKC who did a lot for dogs by telling this story. Our best wishes go out to his friends and family.

You can watch a clip from Icebound here.

 

From the Los Angeles Times: His most recent film was "Icebound" (2012), which focuses on a famous story: the 700-mile sled dog relay that delivered serum to victims of a deadly diphtheria outbreak in Nome, Alaska, in 1925.

While previous chroniclers concentrated on the dog Balto (voiced by Kevin Bacon in a 1995 animated movie) and his Norwegian-born musher, Leonhard Seppala, Anker drew attention to other members of the heroic team, including native Alaskan mushers who played crucial roles in the relay. Part of the film re-creates the run along the original route and includes interviews with descendants of the team members as well as survivors of the outbreak.

He also sought to explain the backdrop for the dramatic event, exploring the political and racial angles that made the plight of white children in Nome headline news while earlier epidemics affecting mainly Alaskan natives went virtually unnoticed.

"It's a small moment in history for which you can extrapolate all these larger truths about American culture," Anker told the Associated Press in December when it opened the Anchorage International Film Festival.