10 Things Only a Pembroke Welsh Corgi Owner Would Understand

If you own a Pembroke Welsh Corgi, we're sure you can relate!

1. You can define “Frapping” – code for “frantic random acts of play,” which usually conclude with dramatic slides across linoleum or wooden floor.

 

2. You field endless questions about “what happened to his tail?” A Corgi owner’s side of the man-on-the-street interview usually goes something like this:

This is a tailless breed.
No, he did not have a tail when I got him…
Right, there is another type of corgi, with a tail; that’s the CARDIGAN Welsh Corgi.

This repeats every other day (or more often in big cities).

pembroke welsh corgi

 

3. You're also forced to answer questions that defy the principles of anatomy, like “Will he grow into his legs?” or “Will she grow into those ears?” And you know the usual Corgi owner response, delivered with feigned amusement: "It’s a dwarf breed; this is as big as he’ll get." Also, "Nope. No chance she’ll fly with these ears."

Corgi Photo

 

4. Bunny butts. The rear end of a Corgi is a source of fascination to many. "No, sir, this is not a rabbit on a leash. It is called a Pembroke Welsh Corgi."

Corgi Bunny Butt

 

5. Hearing surprised comments, like, “He sure can run fast on those little legs!” Why, yes, Pems are very athletic. How else could they keep a herd of cattle in line?

 

6. You wear Corgi hair with pride and can even knit a sweater with it. This double-coated breed sheds voluminously. The amount of hair shed in relation to the size of the dog never ceases to amaze those who are less diligent about grooming.

Shedding Corgi

 

7. You're familiar with the Corgi’s two preferred poses—sleeping on his back with all four in the air, and flat on her belly with all four spread out (a.k.a., the flying squirrel). 

Upside down corgi

 

8. The bottomless appetite. See number 3 above. While he won’t grow taller, a corgi can always grow wider.

corgi and bowl

 

9. The clown vs. the policeman. Herein lies the dichotomy of the corgi. Serious or Goofball? Both strains exist.

 

10. Setting the herding record straight. Sure, they might make good barn dogs, but Pembroke Welsh Corgis are not terriers. Your Corgi won’t sniff out your bedbugs, kill roaches, or catch mice. But he might herd your cats. (Or your kids.)

 

Photo credits: Lila Lippow (#s 2, 4, 6–8)